Saffron, the Costliest Spice in the World

Saffron, the Costliest Spice in the World

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Saffron, the Costliest Spice in the World

Posted on Dec 26 2012 at 02:43:31 PM in Food & Drink

Saffron, the Costliest Spice in the World

Saffron is the costliest spice in the world, due to the labor intensive process of picking the three tiny stigma of each crocus flower. Only 5 to 7 pounds of saffron can be harvested from one acre of land. Fortunately, little is needed for most recipes. Amazon recently was selling a 16 ounce tin of Saffron for $1,009.00 or $63.06 per ounce.

 

From 70,000 to 250,000 flowers are needed to make one pound of saffron. Saffron comes from the autumn crocus, Crocus sativus, grown mainly in lands with a long hot summer. It grows from Spain to India, two of the main countries that export this spice. Some of the best saffron in the world comes from Iran and India, but is also found in Egypt, Morocco, and Turkey, among others. It has a penetrating, bitter and highly aromatic taste. A very small amount will produce the most brilliant golden color.

 

Spices are defined as various strongly flavored or aromatic substances of vegetable origin. They are usually obtained from tropical plants, and commonly used as condiments. Spices are generally dried roots, bark, buds, seeds or berries. Herbs are generally defined as the leafy parts of a plant used for flavoring. Saffron seems to fall in neither category, but it is grown in tropical places, and is definitely not leafy matter, so is defined as a spice. It is also used as a dye, to scent perfumes and as an aid to digestion.

 

Probably first cultivated in Asia Minor, saffron was used by all the ancient civilizations of the eastern Mediterranean, the Egyptians and the Romans. Later it was grown in Spain, possibly taken there by Arabs. In the 11th century it reached France, Germany and England. During this time, saffron had great commercial value. Powdered saffron is to be avoided as it is easily adulterated with paprika, turmeric, beets or pomegranate fibers, and even with the tasteless, odorless stamens of the saffron crocus itself. The highest quality saffron is recognized as the deepest in color. Too many yellow stigmas in the mix make it an inferior quality.

 

The flowers are picked once the petals open, late in autumn. The stigmas are removed and set to dry. Saffron is easy to use as its strong yellow dye is water soluble. Common saffron substitutes are annatto, safflower or turmeric, though the flavors are far different. My most early memory of saffron was its use in my Grandmas soup. The entire house smelled of her soup, with its high saffron note. At the time, during my childhood, I knew nothing of saffron, or that it was what made Grandmas soup taste so wonderful. When I discovered saffron on my own, I realized this was what gave her soup that particular flavor and color, and saffron is now a favored spice in my cupboard.


Some uses for saffron are in breads and buns, giving them a lovely golden color. Use saffron in soups where color and aroma are desired. It is a key ingredient in Spains paella, and also used in Frances bouillabaisse and in risottos of Italy. Saffron is excellent with fish dishes. Obviously, it can be used as a dye, with its strong yellow gold color. It is an ingredient in some liqueurs, such as chartreuse. Use your imagination and be creative with its use. The tiniest pinch is all that is needed.

 

About The Author

 

My name is Chris Rawstern and I have been on a cooking and baking journey for 42 years. Many people have asked what A Harmony of Flavors means. Have you ever had a meal where the visual presentation was stunning, the smells were incredible, the taste was so remarkable that you ate slowly savoring every bite, wishing the experience would never end? Then you have experienced what a truly harmonious meal can be like.


My passion is to teach people how to create a Harmony of Flavors with their cooking, and help pass along my love and joy of food, both simple and exotic, plain or fancy. I continue my journey in ethnic and domestic cuisines, trying new things. I would love to hear from you, to help me continue my journey to explore diverse culinary experiences and hopefully to start you on a journey of your own.

 

Visit my Web site http://www.aharmonyofflavors.com my Blog at http://www.aharmonyofflavors.blogspot.com
my Marketplace at http://www.a-harmony-of-flavors-marketplace.com or Facebook page A Harmony of Flavors. I share a recipe or tip each day to the fans that have liked my site. I hope to see you there soon.

  Article Information
Created: Dec 26 2012 at 02:43:31 PM
Updated: Dec 26 2012 at 02:44:21 PM
Category: Food & Drink
Language: English

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