iCloud Beginners Guide

iCloud Beginners Guide

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iCloud Beginners Guide

Posted on Jan 16 2013 at 09:41:07 PM in Software

A Beginner’s Guide to iCloud

So you’re new to Apple, or you just haven’t gotten the hang of this iCloud thing or you want to know more about it. That’s okay, iCloud is simple once you get the hang of it. To begin to understand “iCloud” you will need a general explanation of “cloud computing”.

FreshMacApps.com

 

The Cloud

“The cloud” is a buzzword dreamed up by the marketing teams at major tech companies to explain a system of resource sharing in a whimsical, highly un-technical way. Simply put, the cloud is a way to make resources (such as music, video or text files) available across many devices and platforms. There are many benefits to cloud computing, such as security and accessibility. Instead of spreading your data across several different platforms where they might be vulnerable to many different types of attacks, you can have a single storage site on a remote server that is many more times secure than your Mac, iPhone or iPad.

Many of Apple’s services like the Mac App Store, iOS App Store and the iTunes Store are cloud systems. You buy your songs once and can then download them to your iPhone or home computer. iCloud doesn’t stop there. Apple has pushed its iCloud service to developers who incorporate iCloud’s features into new programs. Many new and updated apps also offer the ability to save your files directly to your iCloud accounts, which you can then access remotely. The benefits to this are many: your files are now securely stored and impervious to hardware failures, power outages, water damage, etc. Also, they are securely stored, so the chance of unauthorized access is much less (if your password isn’t something like abc123.)  

 

The iCloud

iCloud requires you to get an Apple ID, which you usually set up when you get your Apple device. If you have not set up an Apple ID for yourself you can do so through Apple.com. The standard plan for an iCloud account comes with a few free perks, including 5GB of storage space (not including your iTunes and App Store purchases.) Additionally, iCloud will sync your Address Book, iCal, Mail.app and Reminders apps that come standard with any Apple device. Additionally, you can store files created within apps that have iTunes connectivity. Once you reach your 5GB limit, you can purchase additional storage space from Apple. Another perk that comes standard with iCloud is the ability to track your iCloud devices should one of them go missing. Apple runs the website iCloud.com where you can check up on your services including the location services. If your device is missing, you can make it unusable by locking it down, and should you fear that it is in the hands of a master hacker you can also wipe your data remotely. Another benefit of iCloud is your ability to sign up for a free @iCloud.com email address. If you have an iCloud-enabled device, there is no reason not to run this service as soon as you start using your device. 

 

Security and All That Good Stuff

Like any other technology, iCloud is susceptible to tampering and illegal entry. However, it is many times more secure than your current system. Rumors of Apple devices being completely hack-proof are greatly exaggerated. Just to give you an idea of the vulnerability you face, a few months ago I was messing around with my system in ways that were more than a bit boneheaded and I managed to delete all admin privileges from my system. Since I enabled password protection, and since my password was no longer recognized as an administrator, I essentially locked myself out. After spending a useless two hours on the phone with Apple Care being told that I would need to wipe everything and reinstall, I decided to go a different route. What I eventually ended up doing was exploiting a vulnerability that allowed me to create a completely new Admin profile. Using this new admin account, I was able to reestablish my old account as an admin which saved the day along with all my data. The lesson of this story is that, even if you cannot access your own files, there is someone else out there who can. Storing critical data in a cloud system can reduce your vulnerability and ensure that your data is never lost. 

 

Getting Started With iCloud

 

Directions for setting up an iCloud account on an iPhone, iPad or iPod: 

If you have not set up iCloud when you first configured your account on your iOS Device you can do the following:

 

1. From your home screen navigate to the Settings menu (the Gear icon.) 

2. From the settings menu click the iCloud icon.

3. Turn on iCloud. 

4. In the iCloud menu input your Apple ID and password. 

If you do not have an Apple ID go to this link and set up your Account: appleid.apple.com

5. Choose the applications with which you want to have iCloud connectivity.

    Optional: You can choose to enable automatic download this will automatically sync newly purchased apps and iTunes songs across all your iCloud devices.

    purchases across all your iCloud enabled devices. 

    Optional: You may also set up an @iCloud.com email account for free should you choose

    to. 

6. Enable iCloud on other eligible devices. 

 

Directions for setting up an iCloud account with your Mac computer (Minimum requirement – Mac OS X Lion 10.7.4 or later): 

If you have not set up iCloud when you first configured your account on your Mac you can do the following: 

 

1. Go to your settings menu (through either the Dock alias or your Applications folder in the Finder.) 

2. Under the Internet & Wireless settings option you should see the iCloud icon. Click on it. 

3. Turn on iCloud. 

4. Enter your Apple ID and password. 

If you do not have an Apple ID go to this link and set up your Account: appleid.apple.com

5. Choose the applications with which you want to have iCloud connectivity.

    Optional: You can choose to enable automatic download this will automatically sync newly purchased apps and iTunes songs across all your iCloud devices.

    purchases across all your iCloud enabled devices. 

    Optional: You may also set up an @iCloud.com email account for free should you choose to. 

6. Enable iCloud on other eligible devices. 

 

Directions for setting up iCloud on a Windows OS PC (Minimum requirement – Windows Vista with Service Pack 2 or Windows 7 or greater): 

 

1. Download the iCloud Control Panel from: www.icloud.com/icloudcontrolpanel

2. Go to your Windows Start menu and open the iCloud Control Panel. 

3. Enable iCloud and enter your Apple ID and password and set up your iCloud account. 

5. Choose the applications with which you want to have iCloud connectivity.

    Optional: Enable automatic downloads for files purchased on other devices through 

    Apple services like iTunes. 

5. Enable iCloud on other eligible devices. 

freshmacapps.com/2012/12/icloud-guide/

 

  Article Information
Created: Jan 16 2013 at 09:41:07 PM
Updated: Jan 16 2013 at 09:41:07 PM
Category: Software
Language: English

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